Creating Beautiful
Whidbey Island Landscapes


that celebrate the unique history, ecology and character of our island home.

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Who has the last word?

The theme of this year’s Hardy Plant Study Weekend was “Married To Your Garden: How to Save the Relationship”, this year hosted by the Northwest Perennial Alliance in Bellevue.  Four days jam-packed with plant and book sales, area garden tours, meeting up with old friends and colleagues and an incredible horticultural display.  Morning and evening speakers took primarily humorous positions on the topic – gardening as a couple; “flings” with newer cool plants,  garden burnout.   We got to hear Frank Ronan twice and  sounded much like the column he writes for Gardens Illustrated, self-depracating sprinkled with a few well-earned jabs to this primarily northwest gardening community – such as the ghastly use of plant labels in the garden.  He also took issue with our overuse of mulch because then you don’t get self-sowers – those plants that sprinkle themselves around, often into the perfect places.  Several of his quotes resonated with me, such as “A garden is at its best when nature asserts itself and makes it better.”

Of course, every garden on the tour faced with 450 visitors was primped to be at it’s best.  But nature still had her own way a bit.

Grotto in a Bellevue garden.

Grotto in a Bellevue garden.

Georgetown garden.

Georgetown garden.

Georgetown garden.

Georgetown garden.

Spilling into the alley, Georgetown garden.

Spilling into the alley, Georgetown garden.

Spilling into the alley, Georgetown garden.

Spilling into the alley, Georgetown garden.

North Seattle entry posts.

North Seattle entry posts.

Ruin in Bellevue.

Ruin in Bellevue.

Normandy Park garden.

Normandy Park garden.

 

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